Thursday, July 29, 2010

Depression In Color

These images, by photographers of the Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information, are some of the only color photographs taken of the effects of the Depression on America’s rural and small town populations. The photographs are the property of the Library of Congress and were included in a 2006 exhibit Bound for Glory: America in Color.

Homesteader and his children eating barbeque at the New Mexico Fair. Pie Town, New Mexico, October 1940. Photo by Russell Lee.

Worker at carbon black plant. Sunray, Texas, 1942. Photo by Worker at carbon black plant John Vachon.

Mrs. Viola Sievers, one of the wipers at the roundhouse giving a giant "H" class locomotive a bath of live steam. Clinton, Iowa, April 1943. Photo by Jack Delano.

Children asleep on bed during square dance. McIntosh County, Oklahoma, 1939 or 1940. Photo by Russell Lee.

A store with live fish for sale. Vicinity of Natchitoches, Louisiana, July 1940. Photo by Marion Post Wolcott.


To see more of these amazing photographs click

8 comments:

Mongo said...

Josh, that's a great collection of photos. It's odd how much color vs b/w changes the imagery.

motoguru. said...

Wow, there's a lot of great shots there! I really like the ones by M.P. Wolcott.

B said...

great post. the color adds a feeling of "modernity" that you just never get with shots from the era.

Mac said...

carbon worker shot was incredible. wow. thanks for the heads up.

Fashion Serial Killer said...

Did you see the ones they had of Chicago in the old days as well? So great.

cro said...

Shorpy.com runs a lot of great old photos as well.

Love this stuff.

shiftace said...

definately adds a sense of character to the pics and kinda makes me feel connected to them more. The color of those little kids faces, no matter dirt poor or not is beautiful.

Jahluv said...

My grandmother is from the Natchitoches area of Louisiana. I think she was already in Los Angeles by 1940 - from that photo I can see why...