Thursday, March 24, 2011

Well Said

Well Done

16 comments:

Gareth said...

That makes you think - thanks for posting that - Well said!!

Pat said...

Awesome video, great point of view with an amazing delievery. With that said, coming from a memebr of the younger generation, the "will not sell mentality" is a little disheartening.

FatbobsUsedHarleyParts said...

Well said however I have a son and two nephews that know the differance between a flat blade and philips head and how to use it. My son has been working on bikes since he was rwo years old. He has always gone to swap meets with me and my freinds. One day a guy asked him when he was around 5 years old if he was going to have a bike some day? He said I got a 62 Panhead and he is right thats part of my 1/3 rd anyway cool video it our responsbility to pass it on! Later, Brownie

P said...

Males you think about where we are going, and why...... Well made video with a fantastic feel to it, and a portrait of a great personality

Durk said...

Dude has no optimism. Bad breeding probably. Cant paint such broad strokes about upcoming generations... It makes you sound like an eternal A-hole.

Mitch said...

I think it's just in your genes to wanna wrench on shit. and if you think that fuel oil based machinery including the motorcycles we ride are gonna be around for another generation you might be lying to yourself. so maybe we should be learning about how to customize hydrogen powered choppers? so we can hang on to a fragment of what we had and fragments of what the dudes that rode before us had, and change it a little to keep it alive. So maybe some kids today don't know how to turn a wrench; but they could probably hack into a twinky's computer and manipulate some codes or some shit to get more horsepower. it's called evolution. and maybe the dudes that think like this guy just don't want to let it go. that's ok too.

Lucas said...

really?? I'm 19 and would fuckin kill to be able to learn from a guy like that and in a shop as bad ass as his...I'm sure he didn't mean what he said in a bad way but I know for a fact that I'm gunna ride and love bikes till the day I die. And Mitch has the right idea.. If I need to design an awsome hydrogen bobber after I finish getting my mechanical engineering degree to keep this love alive, then so be it...

Jerimiah smith said...

Mitch quit smoking weed...

mindpill said...

cool................ i like your brain mitch.

Michael said...

I'm a teacher..trying to change the way we educate...and I'm a biker trying to learn and continue the "do it with your own hands" mentality. Education needs shop class, boys need dads that change their own oil, and society needs to value creativity. My son can hack an iPod and fix his own skateboard. He knows bearings and bytes. I hope he continues his love of things mechanical and electrical. It's about curiosity concerning how things work, what makes things tick. It's about seeing the intrinsic value in something built by hand; starring at a bike and saying, "Fuck! that took some passion and talent!" Go out and teach someone something today. Hell, come to my school and inspire my students, show them you leave a legacy with a hammer..not just a keyboard

B.C. said...

I can totally understand what this saying,nearing the end of a career as a toolmaker I have seen where the industry is headed. The talent is out there,but the places to apply the craft or get some good training are getting thin. I think we should all get together at Born Free 3 and continue this discussion over a beer.

MIKE BUZZ said...

Growing up everyone fixed there own shit, it maybe true about the youth of today, but we(us old fucks) are many and they are few!the youth of today are not the youth of yesteryear.there is a rare breed of mechanical gearheads out there that sets them aside from the rest of this fucked up society we live in.be glad you are few and not like every dickhead out there trying to be like someone there not!!!

Mark said...

This shop is down the street from my house in Philly, where I also teach art in a public High School. You guys out in Chicago certainly get it, or if you spend any time in a public school you get it. It's hard to watch sometimes, but there are bigger issues at play. With all that being said Michael's right on the money with his statement that we need shop classes and a society that values creativity and not just the kind that makes you rich from playing with other people's money. ehhhhh

Anonymous said...

I live in a town with a population of 1,000 me and at least seven of my Freinds all wrench and build customs... Bikes, rods, whatever we can get our hands on. And were all under 25 years old. The rod culture lives on although it may not be as prevalent as it once was. But we like it that way.

Jason said...

I learned to work on and fix things when I was growing up because we never had the money to pay anyone to do it. It just kinda stuck.

I fell in love with old bikes because they were cheap when I was a kid and thats what my Dad had. He went up at work and moved on to newer bikes that run better, I stayed with the bikes I liked as a kid...

My brother is 8 years younger than I am and by the time he was coming up my parents had a little more money, newer cars and whatnot, so he never learned or wanted to learn how to work on things.

I think there are plenty of people that work on their own shit and learned the old way by trial and error and having older people show them whats up, you just don't see em much because they're not trolling around the internet or going in other guys shops looking to learn.

Rad video though.

old iron said...

at times i feel the same way about the young peaple now days but iam blown a way by the old school bikes and hot rods that these guys are building they are in there 20s and 30s there are fewer people around that do build but the ones that do are exceptional at it yours truly craig stevens at old iron hot rods